The Shack30/05/2010

posted in Make installations, Social Justice, TB/HIV


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A scaled and fully mobile replica of an informal home very commonly found in South Africa and poverty stricken areas the world over was created to act as a gallery space for photographs and stories that chronicle lifestyle and living conditions that contribute to the growth of tuberculosis and HIV in South Africa. This exhibition proved to be very successful as an advocacy campaign as it was a medium that could bring the realities of living conditions to those who would normally never visit a township or slum.

Most of the Shack exhibitions were held at international conferences and parliament where policy and decision makers were gathering to discuss issues related to health and poverty. Its ultimate success occurred in Parliament House Canberra, Australia where it collaborated with the poverty alleviation group RESULTS and succeeded in convincing the Australian government to drop the $75 million debt owed to Australia by Indonesia on condition that $37.5 million was spent on public health through the Global Fund to Stop TB, HIV and Malaria.

The Shack won the support of his Emeritus Archbishop Desmond Tutu and was also visited by Deputy President of South Africa Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka; Executive Director of UNAIDS Dr Peter Poit; and Dr Hiroshi Nakajima – Director General of World Health Organization

A video about the shack in Mexico  Part 1 -  Part 2

Debt to health swap in Austrailia video

Claire Moores speech in Parliament chambers

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  1. [...] am Floyd was a follow up project to the Shack installation when it was exhibited in Parliament in Holland. With KNCV using this exhibition as its [...]

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Nuestra Casa10/05/2010

posted in Make installations, Social Justice, TB/HIV

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Due to customs issues in Mexico after the World AIDS Conference 2008 the Shack had to be destroyed. Fortunately it had gathered sufficient interest by then to keep the concept and message alive. This lives on in Nuestra Casa or ‘Our Home’. This home designed from low income living conditions found along the USA and Mexico border uses materials from locations where documentation took place. Its walls are covered with imagery, stories and memorabilia that speak of the border region with particular attention to tuberculosis and access to health care. Contributing factors such as migration, drug addiction, stigma, prostitution, poverty and working conditions are also covered. To balance the image of the region it also reflects the beauty of culture, tradition and lifestyle found here as well as the resilience of communities to pull together during difficult times.

The final stage of the exhibition ‘Caminero del Espiranza’ (Passage of Hope) includes a series of posters made by Photovoice participants. These pictures and stories depict the life of those affected by TB and how they have overcome TB. Each poster is also accompanied by a way in which the viewer can assist in stopping TB.

Nuestra Casa was developed into a research and social mobilization campaign in El Paso Texas that was exhibited through out 2011. This can be viewed at: http://www.nuestracasainitiative.net/

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Face It! The Stigma Exhibition06/05/2010

posted in Make installations, Social Justice, TB/HIV

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Stigma – a fear based mindset commonly derived out of a lack of understanding of a condition – is one of the major issues holding back development in HIV today. It was in HIV that Schumann became aware of stigma and was devastated by its consequences. But this mindset is not only prevalent in HIV, it affects everyone and all challenging conditions. In this exhibition the nature of stigma: for one to label an individual, condition or group of people, and then refuse to hear (thus understand) the full story of the stigmatised, is inverted through a reversal of reality that reveals stories never before shared with society. Testimonies where shared from people of all race, class, gender, age and religion so that whoever views the work will be able to relate to at least one story and realise this could be themselves and they are in denial, or it could be their friends, family or loved ones and they would never know as they are too afriad to tell anyone.

Face It is currently travelling with the Make Art/Stop AIDS exhibition Not Alone, curated by David Gere and Carol Brown. Contributing Artists include: Clive Van den Berg, William Kentridge, Churchill Madikida, Langa Magwa, Penelope Siopis, Gideon Mendel among others.

Here is an example of a story on anorexia

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  1. [...] yourself artistically. Could you please tell us a bit about your work such as the installation Face It and the 2013 short film I am [...]

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Process06/05/2010

posted in Make installations

 

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Understanding

The art of knowing

The endless cycle of learning that which I am ignorant to

Provoked by experience I ask a question and search for an answer. This process spins the known and the unknown into a conclusion

I ask. I learn. I question something new, slightly more intricate than the question before

The process starts again

As my understanding is made up of shared experience so too must I share my experiences to continue the process from

them to me

me to you

you into us

Photography is my tool to question

Art is my tool to conclude

This exhibition is a part of a process

 

 

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Lifeline05/05/2010

posted in Make installations, Social Justice, TB/HIV

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2009. Mixed media installation. Size: 3x 2.5m long x 1.2m high

Lifeline undertakes the challenging but much needed analysis of HIV in adloescents. Its structure is a physical timeline that chronicles a young womans life from birth until the present day, aged 23. At the age of fifteen she contracted HIV and today she is living a postive life on ARVs. Her story exposes how HIV affected her at different points in her life and how that affected her. These facts are intertwined with other life markers that are more common in adolescents like finishing school, when she got her first boyfriend, and family trauma such as her father dying. She also speaks of how her sexual habits have changed post diagnosis and how her sexual partners have responded to her being HIV positive. Following the story are scanned pages from her only photo album. These photographs depict her life as any other person enjoys to recollect their past. The aim of adding these everyday images was to humanize HIV and show that it can affect anyone, and that people with HIV can still enjoy a normal life. Lifeline in its current form was commissioned to be apart of the international exhibition Not Alone curated by Carol Brown. Its original concept was first presented at the World Aids conference 2009 where the participant joined me to advocate next to her story.

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